David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center

David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center

 

Possessing experience as a fashion designer and fabric and textile manager, Asha Pabla earned an associate’s degree in interior design from the Parson’s School of Design in New York City and a bachelor’s degree in textile and interior design from Philadelphia University’s College of Science & Textiles. In her leisure time, Asha Pabla enjoys visiting the Lincoln Center.

The Lincoln Center hosts festivals and programs continually throughout the year. While many of them are seasonal, the David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center hosts free performing artist events each week. Organized by the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Inc., atrium events welcome national, international, and local artists, as well as Lincoln Center-affiliated groups, such as Jazz at Lincoln Center, the Juilliard School, and the Chamber Music Society.

Music genres represented at atrium events cover the gamut of soul, hip-hop, pop, jazz, rock, classical, and country, among others. In addition, some concerts social dancing events featuring live swing, salsa, and tango.

For those who have children, LC Kids performances take place on Saturday mornings. The interactive hour-long kids’ concerts and story times are appropriate for various age groups. While some events are all-ages affairs, others are designed specifically for younger or older children, as noted in program descriptions.

AIF Raises $150,000 for 70 Million People with Disabilities in India

American India Foundation pic
American India Foundation
Image: aif.org

As a fashion designer for Liz Claiborne from 1989 to 1991, Asha Pabla scouted New York City for fashion inspiration and developed numerous designs selected for line production. In addition, Asha Pabla has served on the board of directors of the American India Foundation (AIF).

Founded in the wake of the Gujarat earthquake in 2001, AIF is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving lives in India and developing strong US-India relationships.

AIF’s Annual Washington, DC, Gala, which took place on September 23, 2016, at the Congressional Country Club in Bethesda, Maryland, raised $150,000. The funds will go directly toward AIF’s Ability-Based Livelihood Empowerment (ABLE) program.

Dedicated to improving the lives 70 million people with disabilities in India, the ABLE program aims to deliver individuals opportunity of a dignified existence and gainful employment. AIF stresses education and believes that people are defined by what they do rather than what disability they have.

For more information about AIF and its programs, visit www.aif.org.

Hamilton – The Broadway Phenomenon’s Real-World Impact

Hamilton pic
Hamilton
Image: hamiltonbroadway.com

Former fashion designer Asha Pabla worked with Liz Claiborne in New York before transitioning into leadership roles with nonprofit organizations. Outside of her work with charities like American India Foundation, Asha Pabla enjoys attending theatrical performances in New York. Her recent favorites include Kinky Boots and Hamilton.

Hamilton, the wildly popular hip-hop musical about America’s founding fathers, has made big waves in the world of theater since its 2015 debut. It won 11 Tony Awards, earned a Pulitzer Prize, and sold out for the entire first run. Hamilton’s influence has spread from the theater to the rest of American culture in some truly unexpected ways.

After a popular push to include an American woman on the face of U.S. currency, the Treasury secretary was poised to replace Alexander Hamilton with Harriet Tubman on the $10 bill. Hamilton the musical became immensely popular right around this time, causing Andrew Jackson to be bumped from the $20 instead.

Hamilton is also changing the way the Revolutionary War is taught in American schools. Alexander Hamilton, usually passed over to discuss Madison, Jefferson, and Washington, is now being discussed much more in American classrooms than he was in years past. The Rockefeller Foundation even worked with producers to help 20,000 students see the show in New York.